Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

For a laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), the surgeon inserts special long instruments through several small incisions to remove the prostate. One of the instruments has a small video camera on the end, which lets the surgeon see inside the abdomen.

 

Laparoscopic prostatectomy has some advantages over open radical prostatectomy, including less blood loss and pain, shorter hospital stays (usually no more than a day), and faster recovery times (although the catheter will need to remain in the bladder for about the same amount of time).

 

In experienced hands, LRP appears to be as good as open radical prostatectomy, although we do not yet have long-term results from procedures done in the United States.

 

The rates of major side effects from LRP, such as erection problems and trouble holding urine (incontinence) seem to be about the same as for open prostatectomy. (These side effects are described below.) Recovery of bladder control may be delayed slightly with this approach.